Consumer Alert – Foul Smelling Amul Curd Cup Showing July 2018 As Mfg.Date

 

Sachin Shastri @sachinshastri23

@Amul_Coop bought this curd cup from a shop at Ahemadabad rly station, apart from being foul smelling, it shows mfg date as July 2018 (while we are still living in June 2018). Can’t expect such breach of trust from you. @fssaiindia @jagograhakjago @irvpaswan

 

Advertisements

Effective labels for food items recommended

The draft laws state high in fat, sugar or salt food products “shall not be advertised to kids in any form”, the CSE said.
New Delhi: A Delhi-based green body on Wednesday said it has submitted recommendations to FSSAI on the draft regulations on labelling released by the food regulator, urging it to make the norms “effective and stringent”.
In April, the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) issued a draft of the Food Safety and Standards (Labelling and Display) Regulations, 2018 and sought comments from stakeholders.
The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) in a statement said that the draft has “major gaps” and called for making it “effective and stringent”. The CSE said it has submitted recommendations to FSSAI to “ensure a labelling framework in the country”.
CSE deputy director general C. Bhushan said: “A strict labelling law is important to combat obesity and non-communicable diseases plaguing our country. Though this draft directives are a good beginning, it has major gaps that need to be plugged to make it effective.” One of the “gaps” the CSE said the draft “dosen’t provide for labelling of crucial aspects such as added sugar and dietary fibres”.
CSE programme director (food, safety and toxins) A. Khurana said: “Health and nutrition experts recommend it is best to avoid added sugar in food items. It can be measured and controlled and hence must be labelled. Also, dietary fibre is a key beneficial component of our diet and must be labelled. This will help consumers make informed and healthy food choices.”
The draft laws state high in fat, sugar or salt food products “shall not be advertised to kids in any form”, the CSE said. CSE programme manager S. Taneja said: “Kids are consumers of HFSS items. With many kids becoming obese, the FSSAI must adopt to regulate ads of HFSS foods.

FSSAI looking at global norms to finalise labelling regulations

Companies voice concern over colour-coded labels
NEW DELHI, MAY 15
The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) is looking at global models adopted by various countries for labelling standards of packaged foods. This is being done before the Food Safety and Standards (Labelling and Display) Regulations, 2018, is finalised by the government.
In April, the regulator released the draft of the labelling regulations which has proposed front-of-the- pack nutritional information, besides red colour coded labels for foods which have high levels of fat, sugar and salt content. Some food companies have raised concerns about the red colour-coded labels.
Pawan Agarwal, CEO, FSSAI, said, “Food businesses have no issues with front-of-pack labelling. They have raised concerns regarding the thresholds and colour-coded labels for HFSS foods. We are looking at various global models such as the Australia-New Zealand model that has voluntary star rating or the Mexico and UK model. We are seeking comments and views from stakeholders on the same before we finalise the labelling regulations.”
The labelling regulations are likely to be finalised in the next two-three months.
“We want food businesses to begin taking cognisance of the fact that whatever they produce is important from a public health perspective and not just from their bottomline perspective. It is being done in consumer interest. We have asked food companies for their gameplan to look at launching healthier food options in the market,” he added.
FSSAI has also proposed that a company must make a declaration on the label in case its food product has 5 per cent or more of genetically engineered or genetically modified ingredients. “This has been proposed to increase consumer awareness. Imported GM food is coming to India whether its in the form of soya products and edible oils. In case of oils, GM is negligible.” he added.
Transfat content
Asked about the launch of WHO’s plan to remove transfat from the global food supply, Agarwal said, “We are also working on a goal to make India trans-fat free by 2022. The permitted levels of trans-fat content in edible oils has been set at 5 per cent. We are conducting various studies and getting opinions of experts on whether this needs to be further reduced.”
Meanwhile, FSSAI on Tuesday launched a nation-wide campaign to promote safe and nutritious food at workplace called SNF@Workplace . This has been done to encourage companies to ensure nutritious and hygienic food is served and consumed by their workforce in offices. FSSAI has also launched the ‘The Orange Book: Your Guide to Safe and Nutritious Food at the Workplace’ to highlight the role to be played by key stakeholders such as the administration, canteen establishment and the employees in ensuring safe and nutritious food at the workplace.

FSSAI proposes labelling norm for food products with GM ingredients

NEW DELHI:

Food regulator FSSAI has proposed that all packaged food items with 5 per cent or more genetically modified (GM) ingredients should declare the information through labelling. 

It had last month issued a draft of Food Safety and Standards (Labelling and Display) Regulations, 2018 and sought comments from stakeholders. The final regulation is likely in the next two months. 

“All food products having total Genetically Engineered (GE) ingredients 5% or more shall be labelled. The total GE ingredients shall be of top three ingredients in terms of their percentage in the product,” the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) said in the draft. 

The labelling shall be as — “Contains GMO/Ingredients derived from GMO”, it added. 

In India, Bt cotton is the only GM crop allowed for commercial cultivation. The government has not permitted GM technology in cultivation of food crops like brinjal and mustard amid safety concerns. 

The FSSAI draft regulations prescribe the labelling requirements of pre-packaged foods and display of essential information on the premises where food is manufactured, processed, served and stored. 

On labelling of alcoholic beverages, FSSAI has proposed that the labels should carry a statutory warning — CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOL IS INJURIOUS TO HEALTH; BE SAFE – DON’T DRINK AND DRIVE –– in English language. 

In case, states want the warning to be printed in the local or regional language, it should be allowed, without the need for repeating the English version. 

FSSAI has also proposed that the country of origin of the food shall be declared on the label of food imported into India. 

“When a food undergoes processing in a second country which changes its nature, the country in which the processing is performed shall be considered to be the country of origin for the purposes of labelling,” the draft said. 

Sugar industry sees red in FSSAI’s red coding plan

A draft policy issued by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) that mandates displaying a red colour coding on front-of-the-pack labels on packaged food products with high fat, sugar or salt levels has made the country’s sugar sector turn red
The proposed draft Food Safety and Standards (Labelling and Display) Regulations, 2018, are now in public domain for suggestions and feedback before they are notified.
A draft policy issued by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) that mandates displaying a red colour coding on front-of-the-pack labels on packaged food products with high fat, sugar or salt levels has made the country’s sugar sector turn red. For the country’s sugar millers who are already reeling under the impact of falling prices and a piling inventory, this move could come as a major blow since it would imply that consumption of sugar is harmful for health.
Members of the Indian Sugar Mills Association (Isma) and National Federation of Cooperative Sugar Mills, which represent both private and cooperative sugar sectors, plan to meet top FSSAI officials and Union ministers to oppose the draft policy.
In the draft regulations, FSSAI said, “The block(s) of nutrient(s) for “High Fat, Sugar and Salt” (HFSS) food shall be coloured ‘RED’….. in case the value of energy Total 15 (kcal) from total sugar is more than 10% of the total energy (kcal) provided by the 100 g/100 ml of the product; the value of energy (kcal) from trans-fat is more than 1% of the total energy (kcal) provided by the 100 g/100 ml of the product; and total fat or sodium content provided by the 100 g/100 ml of the product is more than the threshold values.” The proposed draft Food Safety and Standards (Labelling and Display) Regulations, 2018, are now in public domain for suggestions and feedback before they are notified.
Isma vice-president Rohit Pawar said representatives of the sugar sector will be meeting top officials to seek rational reasons for the colour coding for sugar.
“A detailed presentation will be made before the authorities. There is no scientific study that proves that consumption of sugar is harmful for health,” Pawar said.
Isma director general Abhinash Verma said the question that would be posed to the authorities is that whether there is any scientific study which proves that consumption of food which has more than 10% sugar is harmful for health.”
“Second, if this has been started taking the Western countries into account, one must remember that per capita consumption of India is barely 20 kg per annum as opposed to 67-68 kg per annum in the US and 55-65 kg in most European nations,” he said. “India’s PCI of sugar has remained flat at nearly 10% at 19-20 kg per annum. Moreover, India is a developing nation with a large populace under the BPL category. Sugar continues to remain the cheapest source of energy for the common man,” Verma pointed out.

Consumer tweets : Labelling defects

Color Coding To Help Buyers Differentiate Between Healthy & Unhealthy Foods

Health conscious eaters or people who are looking for foods that are devoid of harmful chemicals and GMO often have a tough time at markets because it’s not exactly easy to distinguish GMO and chemical-free goods from the entire lot. However, a new regulation introduced by India’s apex food safety regulator, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), may soon change that.
FSSAI has made it compulsory for all food manufacturers to display a red color coding on front-of-the-pack labels borne by packaged food products that are high in fat, sugar or salt levels. Currently food packets – or boxes – carry a general table containing all the nutritional information like calories, total fat, trans-fat, total sugar and salt per serving, but with the new regulation in effect, for products that will contain high levels of fat, salt and sugar, the percentages of dietary energy values will be highlighted in red on the labels. Though a first for India, this is a common practice in many countries.
Additionally, the food safety and standards controller has also suggested that all food products that have 5 percent or more of ingredients that are genetically engineered or modified (GMO) should carry a clear declaration stating the same.
The proposed draft Food Safety and Standards (Labelling and Display) Regulations, 2018 are now in the public domain for suggestions and feedback before they are notified, reports The New Indian Express. What do you think, will this move make selecting foods at markets easier for us or will it have no major effect? Let us know what you think in the comments below.